Archive for the 'Young Adult' Category

Book Review: Reincarnation by Suzanne Weyn

Book Review Reincarnation

 

My 58th book this year.

Reincarnation started from the prehistoric times and extended up to the modern era, the love between these lovers ran across the space of time. It started with a fight in a cave over a green jewel, and then went through the times of the Egyptian pharaohs, Greek temples, Massachusetts witch trial, battlefields during the Civil war, Paris before the World War II, America in the 60s and lastly, a pair of modern day teen-agers.

I took a chance with this book because I love stories about reincarnation – I find it interesting on how two lost souls finally found each other and live happily ever after. But I end up frustrated and disappointed. I seldom read young adult novels, I carefully choose the subject of which to read. Though the concept of this book is perfect, yet the author ruined a perfectly good concept. I will always think twice if I wanted to read another book about reincarnation.

Usually, I can finish a short book – especially one that interests me in a day or less. But this one took me more than a week. Yes, this is one of the worst books I ever read, the story is redundant and it didn’t seem to end. Not to mention that the ending is very anticlimactic! It would have been good if she settled for just two stories rather than going through history. No, I wouldn’t recommend Reincarnation to friends who’s like to read a short, good book.

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Book Review: The DUFF (Designated Ugly Fat Friend)

The Duff

My 49th book this 2011.

The DUFF (Designated Ugly Fat Friend) is hidden beneath my copies of regency romance novels. What made me read this YA book is the title. Okay, DUFF? Never heard of it before, it caught my interest and started reading the pages and finished it in one day.

The first question that instantly popped into my mind was that, was I the DUFF in my clique? Did I just sit in one corner and watched my friends enjoy themselves? Well, I really don’t think so. I really didn’t think we had a DUFF, I think we all were at some point of our lives.

See Synopsis.

The story revolves around a cynical teen named Bianca. Bianca Piper, a seventeen year-old girl in her senior year, is a fantastic character that can make you laugh. She has two great friends who really love her and a dysfunctional family who loves her as well. Wesley described her perfectly: What you are is an intelligent, sassy, sarcastic, cynical, neurotic, loyal and compassionate girl. She tends to bottle up her problems and finds a way to escape them.

Rather than dealing with her issues, Bianca or B to her friends, mastered the art of escapism. Understandable for teens, most of us had been there. But unlike the usual teens who lose themselves in a good book or movie, she loses herself in the bed of her arch-enemy, the man-whore himself, Wesley Rush. The guy she hates so much. So I guess there is REALLY a thin line between love and hate.

Bianca may sound real to you, but Wesley Rush seemed to come out of a fairytale. Although I like his character development, he started out as a jerk in the beginning and turned into a prince-charming who learned the consequences of his actions and showed a possibility of becoming a future decent and normal teen. I love the way he harassed B in the latter part, sending her nice flowers and a note in class stating: “Wesley Rush doesn’t chase girls, but I’m chasing you”.

What is more surprising in this book is that the author discussed teen sex. Her dealing of the controversial topic is very honest. I have never expected it in a YA novel, having read some way back (and even now). It didn’t seem to appear that Keplinger excuse or forbid sex, rather she just presented reality. She included sex scenes in her book with tact that many other YA authors failed to do.

The DUFF (Designated Ugly Fat Friend) is a smart, honest, funny and heart-warming novel. It revolves around the vital issues that teens deal – family, friendship, love and insecurities. The issues may look heavy to you, but this is really a light and effortless read. The book is really nice and you will want to pick it up again just in case you are in a bad mood and need to lighten up.

Favorite Quotes:

  • No matter where you go or what you do to distract yourself, reality catches up with you eventually.
  • Escape is impossible, so why not embrace it

Where She Went

by Gayle Forman

(A book in the If I Stay series)

It’s been three years since the devastating accident . . . three years since Mia walked out of Adam’s life forever.

Now living on opposite coasts, Mia is Juilliard’s rising star and Adam is LA tabloid fodder, thanks to his new rock star status and celebrity girlfriend. When Adam gets stuck in New York by himself, chance brings the couple together again, for one last night. As they explore the city that has become Mia’s home, Adam and Mia revisit the past and open their hearts to the future – and each other.

Told from Adam’s point of view in the spare, lyrical prose that defined If I StayWhere She Went explores the devastation of grief, the promise of new hope, and the flame of rekindled romance.

City of Fallen Angels

by Cassandra Clare

(The Fourth Book in the Mortal Instrument Series)

Released April 5, 2011

The Mortal War is over, and sixteen-year-old Clary Fray is back home in New York, excited about all the possibilities before her. She’s training to become a Shadowhunter and – most importantly of all – she can finally call Jace her boyfriend. But nothing comes without a price. Someone is murdering the Shadowhunters who used to be in Valentine’s Circle, provoking tensions between Downworlders and Shadowhunters that could lead to a second, bloody war. And when Jace begins to pull away from her without explaining why, Clary is forced to delve into the heart of a mystery whose solution reveals her worst nightmare: she herself has set in motion a terrible chain of events that could lead to her losing everything she loves. Even Jace.

 

The Duff: Designated Ugly Fat Friend

by Kody Keplinger

Seventeen-year-old Bianca Piper is cynical and loyal, and she doesn’t think she’s the prettiest of her friends by a long shot. She’s also way too smart to fall for the charms of man-slut and slimy school hottie Wesley Rush. In fact, Bianca hates him. And when he nicknames her “Duffy,” she throws her Coke in his face.

But things aren’t so great at home right now. Desperate for a distraction, Bianca ends up kissing Wesley. And likes it. Eager for escape, she throws herself into a closeted enemies-with-benefits relationship with Wesley.

Until it all goes horribly awry. It turns out that Wesley isn’t such a bad listener, and his life is pretty screwed up, too. Suddenly Bianca realizes with absolute horror that she’s falling for the guy she thought she hated more than anyone.

Kimberly Derting: Desires of the Dead

BOOK 2

The missing dead call to Violet. They want to be found.

Violet can sense the echoes of those who’ve been murdered—and the matching imprint that clings to their killers. Only those closest to her know what she is capable of, but when she discovers the body of a young boy she also draws the attention of the FBI, threatening her entire way of life.

As Violet works to keep her morbid ability a secret, she unwittingly becomes the object of a dangerous obsession. Normally she’d turn to her best friend, Jay, except now that they are officially a couple, the rules of their relationship seem to have changed. And with Jay spending more and more time with his new friend Mike, Violet is left with too much time on her hands as she wonders where things went wrong. But when she fills the void by digging into Mike’s tragic family history, she stumbles upon a dark truth that could put everyone in danger.

Lauren Oliver: Delirium

Ninety-five days, and then I’ll be safe. I wonder whether the procedure will hurt. I want to get it over with. It’s hard to be patient. It’s hard not to be afraid while I’m still uncured, though so far the deliria hasn’t touched me yet. Still, I worry. They say that in the old days, love drove people to madness. The deadliest of all deadly things: It kills you both when you have it and when you don’t.

Lauren Oliver astonished readers with her stunning debut, Before I Fall. In a starred review, Publishers Weekly called it “raw, emotional, and, at times, beautiful. An end as brave as it is heartbreaking.” Her much-awaited second novel fulfills her promise as an exceptionally talented and versatile writer.